Phasing of redevelopment – changes applied for

In August 2013 a planning application was made which alters the sequence of demolition as set out in the original planning application as described in a previous posting.  It can be found here.   Revised proposals regarding building heights can be seen here.

In addition, a 59 page revised planning statement can be found here.

For a full list of scanned documents, look here.

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Link to Venture Centre

Click here to see a 20 minute video made in the early 1970′s which shows what the Adventure Playground was like and what it stood for.

Go to the Venture Centre’s facebook page here then if you use face book you can tell VCA what you want from it or what you think it could usefully do.

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The KHT plans in detail

Wornington Green from the North West

Wornington Green 

The pictures shown above come from a  file which shows details of all phases of construction although the dates have slipped already.  It can  be accessed by clicking here.  The information is in a large (7.65MB) PDF file which opens in a new window, so that it can be retained at the same time as this site and, once downloaded, you can save it for later reference.    If necessary you can download the PDF reader here:

Get Adobe Reader

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Anuvahood (Justin Marciano) 2010 Certificate 15

Anuvahood is nearly all filmed in a tight area on Wornington Green Estate.  You can forget what happens at the Notting Hill end of Portobello Road, this is the Golborne end.Adam Deacon is a main character in the film besides having written the screenplay and directing it.   In contrast to his ‘heavy’ role in Kidulthood and Adulthood, written by Noel Clarke and recently shown on BBC3,  K (“My name’s not Kenneth, it’s Kaaaaaayyyyyyyyyy man!”) is more of a comic book character.

In the film’s opening scenes K gets knocked to the ground outside Laimsburys after joshing about with some mates and getting too lippy.  Next minute Richard Blackwood appears outside as the store manager and gives K a dressing down for apparently being asleep on the floor outside 10 minutes after he should have been inside stacking shelves.  After this K, a would be rapper, storms off to manage his ‘Deal with the pain’ CD, echoing Adam Deacon’s real life status with Plan B.

K then goes off to Honest John’s record shop (called rhythm diversion in the film) accompanied by T.J., his stylish and slightly camp sidekick who is played by Jazzy Zonzolo. We then find out that none of K’s CD’s have sold and after blustering with the manager he accepts three quid for three missing copies.  Meantime, just near the top end of the estate, a dark girl with blonde hair comes out and smashes the guitar painted in Rasterfarian colours  of a busker (Levi Roots) who is singing about his hot reggae sauce.

At this point the titles roll with Tiny Tempah’s “Pass Out” in the background, shots taken around the estate show the cast and bystanders until the huge and muscular Tyrone (played to a point of near madness by Richie Campbell) appears and starts mashing up people and things outside the Caribbean café (Yum Yums).  Next, while K and his spar are sitting hiding from Tyrone a convertible passes by with two pretty blond white girls plus one black and one white guy who turn out to be drugs mainmen– ‘one day, one day’ K’s saying…  and so the story starts.

The film includes blowing some weed, a mad sex scene (Tyrone again with his bit on the side and some baby oil) and apart from that is a side cracking romp based on close observation of what local people can get glimpses of. It has a big supporting cast from the local area all of whom are generously credited at the end.

A here and now equivalent of “Trainspotting”.

Zigzag

 

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Some photos

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Residents’ Association site updates

Click here to see the updated site which is also listed under ‘External sites’

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